Council of Ministers Wants to Negotiate the Relocation of ICMP’s DNA Lab

Bosnian Council of Ministers urged an organization, founded to search for the remains of persons went missing during the Bosnian war and identify them, to put on hold the relocation of its DNA identification lab in Bosnia to The Netherlands.

The relocation of DNA lab from Bosnia to The Hague could delay the process of identifying missing persons in Bosnia in the next five months, the Council said

The International Commission on Missing Persons, ICMP, was created at the initiative of US President Bill Clinton in 1996 at the G-7 Summit in Lyon, France. The ICMP’s initial mandate was to help account for the approximately 40,000 persons reported missing as a result of the fighting from 1991 to 1995 in former Yugoslavia. With the advent of DNA identification, the organization’s results improved vastly. ICMP has also helped identify the victims of hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the Asian tsunami in 2004, and more recently the victims of the violent collapse of Libyan regime in 2011.

The organization moved its headquarters from Sarajevo to The Hague and opened its main DNA lab there in October this year.

In 2005, ICMP was a co-founder of the Bosnian Missing Persons Institute, together with the Council of Ministers.

The Council asked ICMP this week to negotiate the relocation of its DNA lab, in accordance with the 2005 agreement on the Missing Persons Institute.

The relocation of DNA lab from Bosnia to The Hague could delay the process of identifying missing persons in Bosnia in the next five months, the Council said after a session this week, and in the long run it may slow down the process because the bone samples from unidentified remains will have to be sent to that city.

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